Sometimes The Bravest Thing You Can Do Is Get Help

I can’t pinpoint when my depression started, but I would say it followed when I was diagnosed with lupus in 2013. I had started an independent life all on my own in the mountains of Colorado only to have to move back to my parent’s home a year later because I could barely pour a cup of coffee.

I ignored my depression for years after moving back home, blaming it solely on the fact that I was physically ill for life. But when medicine started working, and I could pour a cup of coffee without searing pain, my depression became naked.

Blaming it on my illness only lasted so long before the people closest to me could see the pain in my eyes – even when I was laughing.

I met the love of my life in 2016 and we married in sweet November of 2017. Our first year of marriage was a beautiful hot mess. We fought all the time. I cried a lot. He got frustrated. I threw things at doors. He cleaned up broken glass. We didn’t know how to communicate. I was sick – a lot. I winced every time someone awed us saying, “Enjoy that honeymoon stage.” And then, my depression woke up – I hid it under my pillow every night until it was no longer comfortable.

I began to self-harm in 2018 and I did it six times. Every moment was different, but every moment I felt the same hopeless feeling. My brain started to connect the relief from my emotional pain with the act of cutting, and so, it became easier every time.

Try holding this away from your spouse – it ain’t gonna happen. Especially when your spouse is a therapist. My husband knew I hid a lot of my childhood, as well as the ache of my father’s abandonment at 18 and a whole lotta family dysfunction. Maybe it all added up and became too much to bear. My husband did everything he could to prevent my self harming. He hid knives and sharp objects – I tear up as I write it. I was stubborn and didn’t think I needed help.

My body has wounds on my arms and legs, but there were wounds that went so much deeper than anything that bled – than anything you could see. And I needed help.

One morning, with a crick in my neck after how much I had stuffed under my pillow, I agreed to get help. It took everything in me to accept it because accepting it meant I had to face really scary things.

And it was the bravest thing I could’ve done.

I started medication and saw a counselor for a while and today, I’m better for it. And then, as my life would have it, I was diagnosed with a very rare, incurable disease in October that makes me painfully half-blind for months and feels like jellyfish live inside my body. It’s called Neuromyelitis optica – I have my good days, I have my bad days. It’s been easy to fall into depression, but by the grace of God, it’s not prevailed.
Sometimes, I don’t feel like I’m winning, but maybe sometimes we have to fight battles more than once to win. I like to think of my depression as part of my story that had to happen in order for me to be where I’m at today.

I think people who’ve been depressed have a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion and a sincere kindness for others. Maybe we’d not know this deep empathy if we’d not lived through our depression.

If you struggle with depression, here’s a virtual hug and a gentle nudge to seek help if you haven’t. It’s OK. You’re not depression. You have a powerful story to tell. You have a past, a name, and your own quirky awesome characteristics that make you who you are. None of that goes away because you seek help. You’re still you. I’m still me.

You’re already brave.

Who knows, maybe you’ll better for it.

If You Think You’re Tired of Listening to People Talk About Their Chronic Pain, Imagine How Tired They Are of Living With It

Chronic pain affects more than 1.5 billion humans worldwide so the chances that you’ve heard someone talk about their pain is pretty likely. However, if this is your first time hearing about chronic pain, you’ll probably understand it more after reading this.

Chronic pain feels like you’re wearing a 100-pound coat filled with random pricks of cacti. Depending on the kind of chronic pain one is dealing with, it’s likely invisible, which means a lot of people can’t comprehend how someone can feel like this all the time.

I was 21 years old when I was diagnosed with systemic lupus. It’s been seven years now and if you know chronic illness — you know how tired we are of living with it.

I remember the day after I was diagnosed, I needed to go to the grocery store for milk. It was a cold morning in Colorado Springs and as if I wasn’t stiff already, I had worn three layers that made my movement robotic. I remember waiting for the area where the milk was to be clear of people in case I did something embarrassing. Well, as my life would have it, I grabbed the milk carton with my wrists and it slipped down and bounced on the floor. What was more embarrassing was trying to pick it up. Good Lord…it felt like bobbing for apples. All of a sudden I wished I hadn’t worn three layers of clothes as it only made me sweat more. A woman my age came around and picked it up for me (after she must have witnessed how ridiculous I looked). I made a weird, awkward laugh and muttered something like, “Sorry, ha-ha, condensation.” She replied with something along the lines of, “We all do it,” and then she was gone.
I starred at the milk carton in my basket and then at the girl as she walked away. I felt like I had egg on my face — so awkward and embarrassed. I stood there staring at my swollen, rosy hands wondering what my life was going to look like if I couldn’t pick up a carton of milk at 21 years old.

As time went on, the inevitable began. Pouring coffee was a struggle, brushing my teeth became a chore and brushing my hair was never going to happen.

My new normal was greeted by chronic pain in the mornings and kissed goodnight by never-ending tears. I knew I needed to accept the pain but I still couldn’t understand why my body was failing me.

My body continued to fail me throughout the years as I got sick with hypothyroidism, gastritis, migraine, and depression. And as much as I love the cold weather of October, this month has been especially piercing (and still painful) after I was diagnosed with Devic’s disease. They discovered I have optic neuritis and five brain lesions. I couldn’t say why pain likes to torture me. Why, if I’m not vomiting every day from gastritis for a week, I’m flaring in my knees or walking around half-blind with head pain for a month with sleep being my only relief. Why every second of every minute of the day I think about what it used to feel like to not feel a damn thing. And I look at the girl at the grocery store that has that extra pep in her step and I can’t help but feel an ache for normalcy.

I wish people would understand that chronic pain is a disease. It’s pain that requires lifelong management and it’s not cured by a magic pill or magical green tea matcha. People who suffer from chronic illness, or any disease for that matter, didn’t do it to themselves by what they ate or didn’t eat. Think about that before you blame a human being going through their own never-ending pain. Pain is pain and human life is human life. You can do all the right things and eat all the right things, but you won’t escape pain. It meets every one of us at some point in our lives.

Maybe if we tried to listen before we judged, we’d have a lot more people feeling less lonely in their pain.

I’d say I’m an extremely empathetic person toward chronic pain because I’ve been through the lonely part. You don’t even have to explain yourself to me — I just get it — and I’m sorry. I know you miss a thousand and one things and I wish I could tell you every broken part of you will be normal again, but I just don’t have the words. So, I’m going to tell you about the morning I drove to work and heard the Japanese legend of Kintsugi on 90.9 KCBI-FM.

According to legend, a Japanese shogun named Ashikaga Yoshimasa sent a cracked tea bowl back to China for repairs. However, upon its return, he was dismayed that it had been put back together with hideous metal staples and thus, Kintsugi was born. The tea bowl was put back together with golden glue and Yoshimasa found that it was even more beautiful after it had been broken and glued back together than it was before.

Kintsugi is related to the Japanese philosophy of Wabi-Sabi, which calls for seeing the beauty in the imperfect and also mushin, the acceptance of change. I know it doesn’t feel like it now, but as your pain breaks you — cracks you in every way — you’re changing into something new. You are your very own Kintsugi masterpiece.

So, to the people who don’t suffer from chronic illness, the next time you have the urge to give your opinion on chronic pain or perhaps roll your eyes at the person who takes a handi-cap spot even though they’re walking with two legs, remember that not all pain looks the same. Remember that they’re a human being suffering from a silent, invisible illness that you’re lucky you don’t have—and I hope you never have.


Remember that though you’re probably tired of hearing about people’s chronic pain, they’re undoubtedly more tired of living with it.

What if you were the golden glue that mended someone’s brokeness from chronic pain? That makes you part of the beautiful; a part of Kintsugi—a part of the change.

Don’t be a staple.